Thu Jul 27 2017

Jacky in Washington

I just changed jobs – I now work for a small company of only 7 employees. My kind CEO offers health insurance even though she doesn't have to. My health plan covers myself and my one year old son. It was a hard decision leaving my big corporate job to work for a small company, but it's a group of people and a mission I'm passionate about, and I am happy I made the change. Maintaining healthcare was my one concern, and luckily the new company made it available. I think we're going to lose it if Trumpcare passes. If premiums are going to skyrocket over 1500% as predicted, it will not be financially feasible for my CEO to continue offering benefits. That, and since I've been pregnant I now have a pre-existing condition, keeps me awake at night terrified what could happen to our finances if something were to happen to me or my baby and we didn't have healthcare. This country needs single payer universal coverage to allow people like me to work a job I love without fear, to allow entrepreneurs like my CEO to follow their passion without worrying about keeping employees like me who need healthcare, or ruining their bottom line trying to offer benefits to keep employees so they can grow their business. Work with the Democrats to FIX the ACA, I beg the GOP, if y'all are so dead set against universal single payer. Fine. Jus don't blow it up. IThe ACA is saving lives, it's allowing freedom of movement, it's helping small businesses grow. It's keeping sick children alive. It's keeping veterans healthy. Fix it, fix it, fix it. Save it. Save us.

Fri Jul 21 2017

Sally in Washington

I had no health insurance for years in my 50s and 60s because it was just too expensive. Fortunately I had been healthy. I finally qualified for the aca about 4 years ago and the relief is incredible. So far the only problem I have had is a broken foot but even that would have cost thousands of dollars. I favor single payer but in the meantime this is a lifesaver. Thank you President Obama.

Wed Jul 12 2017

Kathi in Washington

I have bipolar disorder, anxiety disorder, and some medical conditions for which I take medication. Two of the medications I take are not available in a generic form, and they would be prohibitively expensive without insurance. I would not be able to function without medication, because I would become severely depressed and experience mood swings. I am a clinical psychologist in private practice, and I would not be able to assist my patients if I am having as much difficulty as they are. Given that I am self-employed, I have to pay expensive monthly premiums which are already difficult to afford. I am very concerned that I would not be able to afford the premiums if the ACA is dismantled. Or I would have to choose a plan with such a high deductible that I wouldn't be able to actually use the plan except in a dire emergency. I am a 62-year-old woman, and my financial status and credit rating were ruined in an abusive divorce. I do not have any savings or investments, and I feel that I must stay healthy in order to keep working as long as possible. I am very angry that the Republicans assume that people who are my age and above are inherently less healthy and therefore should have higher premiums, because my physical health is better that many people who are much younger than I am. I only hope that my health holds up, because I don't know what I will do if it doesn't. It is depressing and horrifying to see that the Republicans are willing to abandon the American people in order to please their wealthy donors. I am terrified for the many, many people who are much less fortunate than I am, and frightened about the possibility of watching the healthcare system disintegrate around us. The bill proposed by the Republicans is criminal.

Wed Jun 28 2017

Erika in Washington

I have triplet sons each of which have all had a form of health care issues that would be deemed under this plan to now be pre-existing conditions. There are 12 years old, the decision to move it with this plan would cause them to have a lifetime of an affordable medical bills that there is no way they could possibly afford.

One was born when the a heart murmur, one was hospitalized for pneumonia at 9 months and the third has ADHD. ALL of these issues cr ate preexisting conditions under Trumpcare!

Personally, I too have multiple preexisting conditions. I was born with a heart murmur, my first pregnancy was an ectopic one and i almost died in the OR and my triplets were delivered via c-section. With my ectopic pregnancy it was planned parenthood who detected early that there was a new issue and sent me to the ER. It was Medicaid that covered the lifesaving surgery that ensured I and my children are here today. It is the protections that AHCA that has ensured excellent affordable health have been given to all of us.

I can't fathom the thought that another woman or mom would not be alive or her children would not receive the same care we have. I will stand against anyone who threatens my children's future access to health. I don't know a single mother who won't be right there alongside me.

Wed Jun 28 2017
I was diagnosed with a chronic medical condition when I was 9. Growing up, I was fortunate to have a mother who was able to fight for me, from keeping me enrolled in a public school to getting me access to experimental drug trials at the National Institutes of Health. But I also saw her in tears over medical bills when my father was laid off after 9/11 and we had to go on Cobra, and how draining negotiations with insurance companies were. At one point, I had to go on a medication that was $100,000 a year and was not covered by insurance. I don’t know how I would have survived without a family with enough savings to keep me covered.

I am now successful, independent, and working in international relations and development in Washington, D.C., which I love. If the A.C.A. is repealed, I will live in constant fear of being laid off or fired and losing my insurance, or worry that I will have a flare-up that would devastate me financially.
Matthew Kimmel, Washington

Wed Jun 28 2017
I was diagnosed with a chronic medical condition when I was 9. Growing up, I was fortunate to have a mother who was able to fight for me, from keeping me enrolled in a public school to getting me access to experimental drug trials at the National Institutes of Health. But I also saw her in tears over medical bills when my father was laid off after 9/11 and we had to go on Cobra, and how draining negotiations with insurance companies were. At one point, I had to go on a medication that was $100,000 a year and was not covered by insurance. I don’t know how I would have survived without a family with enough savings to keep me covered.
I am now successful, independent, and working in international relations and development in Washington, D.C., which I love. If the A.C.A. is repealed, I will live in constant fear of being laid off or fired and losing my insurance, or worry that I will have a flare-up that would devastate me financially.

ACA STORIES

How the Affordable Care Act has helped Washington state residents


Mon Jun 19 2017

Julie in Washington

My name is Julie Negrin, I'm a nutritionist and cooking teacher that's had 4 unrelated cancers by age 42 due to a genetic syndrome called Lynch Syndrome. I lost 4 organs in 2014 and had 18 weeks of chemo, which thankfully, was all covered thanks to the Affordable Care Act! It literally saved my life. Unfortunately, I have a lot of complications now and go to the doctors 6-8 times a week. If the ACA is repealed, I'm scared I won't be able to afford health insurance and wouldn't survive long…please call your senators and urge them to vote no!!

Julie in Washington speaking to Senators Cantwell and Murray



Sun Jun 18 2017

Jennifer in Washington

Sun Jun 18 2017
I'm an asthmatic freelance bookkeeper so I didn't have insurance until January 2015. I used the ER when I had a bad asthma attack. August 2016 at 39 years old I found a lump, and September 9 got the call that I had breast cancer. An aggressive form called Her2+ which has a very high recurrence rate. I did chemo then had a mastectomy, they also found thyroid cancer so that was removed too during all this. March 8 2017 I got the call that I am cancer free, for now, but I still get Herceptin infusions every 3 weeks to reduce recurrence chances. I need these treatments or it's likely to come back! The ACA has literally SAVED MY LIFE!

Sun Jun 18 2017

Debbie in Washington

Sun Jun 18 2017
The ACA has allowed our family to have insurance and healthcare as we run two businesses. As entreprenuers we have created jobs, provide valuable services and are active in our respected communities. It is good to know we have the ACA to cover our family since we are both self-employed. It is an important for us to have access to afforfable and comprehensive health insurance and coverage.

Sun Jun 18 2017

Mark in Washington

Sun Jun 18 2017
My wife and I were in between jobs. I freelance and was on her health plan. For a few months we were in "limbo" but we signed on to the ACA and got were covered for those few months we were "jobless". They covered everything, it was amazing! Thanks Obama.

Because we used the ACA, we are strong supporters. We understand how important it is. It's a "safety net" for folks like us. It's life or death to others. Can't imagine folks not having health insurance in America. If anything bad happens you can lose your home. Crazy.

Sun Jun 18 2017

Marziah in Washington

Sun Jun 18 2017
My daughter has finally been able to work again and now has medical insurance. But until recently she was saved by ACA coverage. She had a pre-existing condition and several providers turned her down. An accident and several days in ICU at Harborview left her with crushing debt, around $100k. If Trump can take advantage of bankruptcy multiple times, I've come to the conclusion she should too.

Sun Jun 18 2017

Liz in Washington

Sun Jun 18 2017
My husband started working in the US over 15 years ago on a H1B visa. He was always covered for medical expenses by his employer. I however had been a seasonal worker for a couple of years and had experienced the difficulty in getting individual coverage. I had used Planned Parenthood for most of my regular checkups. After we married, Michael wished to be seasonal like me which we didn't see as a problem, but due to a blood disorder called Factor 5 Lidein, no one would insure him. The first time we have both had insurance together in many years is due to the inclusions of ACA, and no penalties for pre-existing conditions. I cannot imagine going back to non coverage now.. the older you get, the riskier it is.

Sun Jun 18 2017

Jennifer in Washington

Sun Jun 18 2017
My husband lost his job and went to work for himself. It was important to me that we could keep our same doctors. I signed us up for ACA. Fast forward to this past summer, I was diagnosed with breast cancer. I have a 5-year old and a 9-year-old. I was terrified and also so thankful to have insurance. I was very lucky that I was able to seek treatment at a top notch facility. I have been at an appointment every week and sometimes many a week for the past 6 months. Medical care is expensive. Cancer is expensive. I shudder to think what would be happening with me if I didn't have ACA. I was also able to have genetic testing done which allowed me to make informed decisions for my own care and to have some idea of what risks my daughter and my cousins faced. I'm part way through reconstruction and instead of worrying about getting better I'm worried and anxious that I need to speed up my timeline before the repeal. I'm also afraid of having a pre-existing condition and not being covered for future care related to my breast cancer diagnosis. Thanks to the ACA I will be a breast cancer survivor.

Sun Jun 18 2017

Connie in Washington

Sun Jun 18 2017
Because of the ACA I am able to cover my daughter, age 24, on my health care plan. My daughter underwent a bone marrow transplant at 11 months of age and has multiple medical challenges that will follow her for the rest of her life. She also suffers from severe migraines, which could be related to her early history or could be genetic, and requires multiple expensive prescriptions to prevent and treat them. I worry what will happen to my daughter if the ACA is repealed and pre-existing conditions are no longer covered.

Sun Jun 18 2017

Renee in Washington

Sun Jun 18 2017
Before the ACA my health insurance cost over 1/2 of my monthly income. The ACA cut that in 1/2. So that is one very real concern. But even bigger than that, I'm worried about my very livelihood. I'm a lactation consultant and I work for myself. Parents now expect that lactation services should be covered by insurance because the ACA has that mandate. If that is taken away, it could mean that the way I make a living will be destroyed. Not to mention all those families who won't have access to expert lactation support. Another point is, I've been in practice for 20 years, I own a home (still paying a mortgage of course!) and by most standards I'm doing fine. The repeal of this law could put me in a whole different category.

Sun Jun 18 2017

Kiona in Washington

Sun Jun 18 2017
My father was extremely ill; he was hospitalized for months at a time. He lost his job, and therefore was going to lose his insurance. He couldn't find anyone to cover him because of his pre-existing condition. Between the time his Cobra expired and his next hospitalization, Obamacare went into effect. I don't know what we would have done had he not been able to receive coverage. Our family owes the extra years we had with him to Obamacare. He would have died much sooner without medical treatment.

Sun Jun 18 2017

Cara in Washington

Sun Jun 18 2017
My soon to be ex-husband who I no longer live with lost our family coverage last February when he lost his job with the family company he had worked for for 13 years. As a single mother with three daughters I could not afford private insurance (I am a real estate broker working on property management – thus an independent contractor with lots of business expenses and not a lot of income). For the first time ever I am on Medicaid (as of last May) for myself and my daughters. (5, 8 and 14). Though it is not nearly as good as my previous private insurance I pay no Co-pays for doctor visits nor prescriptions. We would have zero health coverage without ACA. I am highly thankful!

Sun Jun 18 2017

Eden in Washington

Sun Jun 18 2017
My husband (the breadwinner in our home these days) works for a small entrepreneurial company that, unfortunately, provides no benefits to its employees. I have couple of relatively minor pre-existing conditions in terms of cost to my health insurance company, but they still kept me from getting coverage the last time I was without employer provided benefits back in 2006. The ACA is the only way I can get healthcare on the individual market.

Sun Jun 18 2017

Katie in Washington

Sun Jun 18 2017
Provisions in the ACA also positively impact us. I'm worried about losing those provisions and I am concerned that coverage via SCHIP for developmental, neurological and mental health will be curtailed in 2017 or 2018.
SCHIP (state children's health insurance program) is why my husband and I are able to access a high level of therapeutic interventions for my sons with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Even with our "Cadillac" employer provided plan, the OOP costs for ABA and other therapists are out of reach for a modest income family. We have Apple health for the boys as secondary insurance. We used to have a higher income before having two kids with special needs made it impractical for both of us to work FT and get them the help and education they needed.

Sun Jun 18 2017

Anne in Washington

Sun Jun 18 2017
I have a Medicare advantage plan and if I didn't have it available to me I'm not sure what I would do. I have multiple preexisting conditions and am dependent on about 12 different drugs to just get put of bed and function. If I lost that or had a large deductible I wouldn't be able to afford my medical care. I have the double concern because I am on Social Security disability.

On ACA, everything was less money out of my pocket. I had total knee replacement surgery in March. I expected to be there for 2 days but due to pneumonia and a collapsed lung it was 8 days. My portion to pay was only about $1,500. I'm still paying but I wouldn't have been able to afford it without my plan.

Sun Jun 18 2017

Sara in Washington

Sun Jun 18 2017
To have affordable insurance for me who has a pre-existing condition and my children after I was laid off last year and moved into being an independent consultant. Getting insurance from my husband's work would have been 3 times as expensive as what we are paying now.