Wed Jun 21 2017

Erin in Missouri

My story is from Missouri but covers the states of Kansas, Texas and Nebraska. Ours is a story of a genetic mutation that none of us could fathom would bring incredible health challenges to our family. We are the lucky few that have jobs that provide us with insurance. My grandfather's sisters were the first, that we are aware of, to be diagnosed with breast cancer. My mother's cousins and her sister were next. Then my mother was diagnosed in her early 50's with breast and then 3 years later with Uterine. Then I came along at 32 with a diagnosis. Then came my sister in her early 50's and now as I type this note my 78 year old mother awaits another radiology appointment for a 3rd cancer, vaginal. This story is filled with heartbreak and much love. These are the things patients should have to worry about, not whether they can afford the care or be discriminated against because they carry a gene that is beyond their control. A public, civil, and thoughtful conversation must happen in this country on how we move forward with a healthcare plan that protects and enables its citizens to have healthcare with a heart!

Tue Jun 20 2017

Leslie in Missouri

I am a public school teacher and so have always been lucky enough to have health insurance for myself and for my children. It's expensive but worth it knowing that we all have coverage if some unexpected illness arises. Because of the ACA my children, ages 21 and 24, can remain under my coverage until they are 26. Because of the ACA my children were able to get genetics testing done, as their father is known to have 2 cancer gene mutations. Because of the ACA my children will be able to get the recommended annual screenings for those who have these gene mutations when they reach a certain age. Because of the ACA I can have annual mammograms as recommended since my mom had breast cancer.

Tue Jun 20 2017

Shelly in Missouri

I am an artist and landscape designer. I have stage 4 metastatic breast cancer. This cancer currently has no cure. I will be in treatment for the rest of my life (which I hope is longer than the 3-5 year median). I am on year 2. I am 40 years old. At the age of 36 I was diagnosed with early stage breast cancer. Can you say PRE-EXISTING CONDITION? I am married with a daughter who is 8 years old. If the ACA is repealed how will we stay in our house? How will we pay the exorbitant medical bills that are ongoing until I die? Currently each chemotherapy treatment I receive (every 3 weeks) is $42,000. I am thankful I have medical insurance under the ACA.

shelly-mo

shelly-mo


Tue Jun 20 2017

Bryony in Missouri

In April 2015 I was employed as a Social Worker (L.M.S.W.) laid off from a Case Management job at a local homeless Veteran Shelter. I took what work I could get quickly hoping to find full time work again in Social Work ASAP. Unfortunately, in December 2015 I had a severe back injury a herniated disk my L5 -S1. I was working as a courier without benefits. I had never experienced this kind of pain. I needed steroid shots, Physical Therapy, meds, but I was still unable to work full time. I required surgery on November 2016. Since I could not afford private insurance I signed up for the ACA when it first came out. Without the ACA I might have bankrupt, unable to pay my mortgage, homeless, & have to move back in with my parents at 40 years old!

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bryony-mo


Tue Jun 20 2017

Chris in Missouri

As a working artist, musician and teacher, most of my work is contract only, so the Affordable Care Act has made getting health care much easier with keeping my deductible and premiums at a reasonable price. To totally repeal will throw myself and a huge portion of this country into real hardship and basically return us all back to where we were before either scrounging around for a bad high deductible plan or not being insured. I feel that instead of repeal and replace they should improve.

Tue Jun 20 2017

Cody in Missouri

The ACA enabled me to receive treatment that I never would've gotten through traditional insurance. I have a serious pre-existing condition (ulcerative colitis) and now there's no way anybody will insure me.

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cody-mo


Tue Jun 20 2017

Iris in Missouri

Even under the ACA, I've never been able to afford health insurance. I fell into the ever-widening coverage gap. My 6 year old daughter has never been off of Medicaid. In September of 2016, I was diagnosed with cervical cancer. I live with chronic illnesses, besides that. In order to obtain treatment, I must submit 10 different documents proving who I am and how much money I don't have – a task, in itself, too complex to manage without help. I don't have any help. After submitting all my proofs, the administration may still deny my cost-abatement payment plan. A payment plan (for a surgery that may fix my cancer) I cannot hope to pay, regardless. Who will insure me?

Iris-MO

Iris-MO


Tue Jun 20 2017

Andrew in Missouri

Stage IV cancer and had a lapse of coverage for a day that would have resulted in me not getting coverage without the ACA guarantee of not being denied with pre-existing coverage.

Andrew-Mo

Andrew-Mo


Tue Jun 20 2017

Rachel in Missouri

I haven't had insurance until ACA. I'm now 47. I hadn't been to a doctor in easily 20 years except in the case of emergency room visits. I'm lucky in that I'm healthy, but as I'm growing older I'm concerned about general health issues and having the ability to screen for or treat issues that will be coming up as a normal part of aging. I'm self employed and make enough to cover my bills and expenses with very little left over for luxuries. I'm my world healthcare and insurance has always been in a luxury category.

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rachel-mo


Tue Jun 20 2017

Denny in Missouri

My wife & I were able to get insurance via the ACA, but I'm primarily writing for my daughter, who would be devastated if you help to repeal it. My daughter goes to UMKC full-time pursuing a double major, works two or three jobs to help pay her own way, and absolutely could not afford insurance if it weren't for the ACA. I ask you to PLEASE think about how this ignorant repeal will affect REAL people's lives. Forget your partisanship, and try to put yourself in regular people's lives and reconsider your support of repealing the ACA. Your actions have consequences – please remember that, and do the right thing and stand up to those that just want it gone because President Obama enacted it.

Denny-Mo

Denny-Mo


Tue Jun 20 2017

Paul in Missouri

I was laid off in 2004. Hadn't had health insurance until 2015. That's ELEVEN YEARS uninsured! I hadn't been able to refill my blood pressure prescription for nearly 3 years. The ACA allowed that. It was nearly $350 per month LESS than an employer-subsidized plan. Without the ACA, I would not have been able to manage my condition.

paul-mo

paul-mo


Tue Jun 20 2017

Sabrina in Missouri

I have a genetic disorder. It is a pre-existing condition that would only have been prevented if I weren't born. It is degenerative and incurable. Who will insure me? Without the ACA, I can be denied coverage for the rest of my life. Inevitably, I will cost my follow people more in tax dollars without the ACA than with it. Either I need the ACA or I need affordable health-care. It is nonoptional.

Sabrina-mo

Sabrina-mo


Tue Jun 20 2017

Angela in Missouri

I am strongly opposed to the Republican’s attempt to repeal the Affordable Care Act. My husband and I are both self-employed with small businesses in Missouri. We have two young boys, one of whom frequently has to be seen at our local children's hospital for medical issues. Without access to affordable health insurance we would not be able to get him the medical care that he needs. Before the ACA our privately acquired health insurance premiums were rising so high every year we were to the point of not being able to afford insurance for our family. The ACA is not perfect, but I strongly feel it needs time and adjustments to work. The ACA should NOT be repealed and replaced, which would be devastating to millions of Americans.

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Tue Jun 20 2017

Christina in Missouri

If I went on the open market, BCBS quoted me a rate of $927 to insure myself, and $425 to insure my 22 year old daughter. As a self-employed person, I am able to obtain very similar, low deductible coverage for $153 a month for me, and a very nice policy for her in CO for $294. As a small business owner of a mental health center who is also a provider on all insurance panels, I would be unable to afford health insurance. Small business owners deserve to have comparable health coverage WITH the same benefit of excluding pre-existing conditions. My daughter was in a recent car accident at no fault of her own, facing a year of treatment and rehab. Where will this leave her, at such a young age, if pre-existing punishments return???

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Tue Jun 20 2017

Elizabeth in Missouri

I need the ACA because even though I am supposed to be able to get insurance through a professional group (AVMA), their plans became too expensive for my husband and me several years ago. I am not a practice owner. I am a Type-2 diabetic and need coverage that I can afford despite a pre-existing condition. Diabetes requires frequent lab monitoring of blood and urine, eye exams, etc. I NEED DECENT INSURANCE! As does everyone in our age group (>50). My husband is currently healthy, thankfully, but anything can change at any time. We had Blue Cross but they dropped us after 2016 and we had very few choices when we re-enrolled this year.

Tue Jun 20 2017

Kara in Missouri

After finding a mass in my breast when I was a teenager, and a decade of doctors telling me it was nothing due to my young age, I finally pressed and had it checked out closer when my son was two. It wasn’t nothing. It was a fairly rare tumor, that if it metastasizes, chemo and radiation don’t work. You die. There are no treatments.

It was removed. Another surgery was necessary in order to get the surrounding tissue out, as these types of tumors are aggressive and like to come back. This left me with a pre-existing condition that rendered me unable to obtain any insurance that was remotely affordable. I have insurance now through my job. But when the ACA was passed, I knew the relief that so many others in situations like myself felt. There was a fighting chance. I am absolutely terrified of losing my coverage now, in light of the only safety net I would’ve had being ripped away. And I want to see my son grow up.


Tue Jun 20 2017

Kristina in Missouri

The ACA has afforded my family peace of mind. Our son Isaac was born with a spinal deformity that requires him to have growing rods, that need lengthened each year through surgery. He will also require other surgeries so that he can remain independent. Isaac uses a wheelchair, and other durable medical equipment, covered by our insurance. Without the ACA, we would face lifetime maximums, and pre-existing condition clauses, which would be detrimental to our family. Isaac wants to be just like every other kid, play sports, and have fun. We want to be able to continue to offer him every opportunity that he can to succeed. The ACA gives us peace of mind, allowing us to support Isaac.

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Tue Jun 20 2017

Martha in Missouri

My family has benefited from the ACA. My daughter had just returned from teaching in France and was looking for a job when she returned. This was in 2008 and the ACA was not in force. Due to a pre-existing kidney condition, she couldn't find health insurance. She would have been eligible for a very expensive high risk pool but there was a one year waiting period. Her dad and I lay awake worrying about every sniffle and feared she would be hospitalized. By the time the ACA was in place, she had found a job with health insurance. Thankfully the lifetime caps for families had been lifted so she didn't have to worry about changing jobs every time she neared the limit. The ACA gave my family peace of mind.

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Tue Jun 20 2017

Carla in Missouri

I have multiple autoimmune diseases, including 2 that effect my liver. There is no cure, but with medication I can stave off liver failure. 2 of the drugs I take will cost me $1500/monthly if I'm uninsured. That's 2/3 of my take home pay. If my small employer decides they can no longer afford to subsidize our insurance & you repeal the pre-existing conditions mandate in the ACA you are signing my death warrant. I won't die right away, it will take a few years—but liver failure is a horrible way to die & before I lose myself to brain damage from the toxins I will be forced to end my own life on my own terms. I have a whole lot left to do in & offer to this world but I have to keep insurance coverage to do it.

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carla1


Tue Jun 20 2017

Ina in Missouri

This is my grandchild. His dad is self-employed and his mother works part-time in the service industry. Thanks to the ACA marketplace, they were able to get insurance with the help of a subsidy. Without it, they could be left uninsured. He should have a chance for a healthy future. #savetheACA.

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itsababy


Tue Jun 20 2017

Veronica in Missouri

ACA helps my family every time I go to the doctor. Yearly pelvic exams, well-child visits, etc. my co-pay for a doctor's visit is about $40. These costs add up, and I've had more than one sigh of relief at the fee being waived so I can use that money for groceries or bills. In addition, a relative of mine has a young daughter with a pre-existing condition. She said ACA made it possible for her daughter to get the health protection she needs. Without it, her daughter, under 5 years old, would have been denied coverage.

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Tue Jun 20 2017

Rachel in Missouri

I decided I wanted a change from the typical 9-5 schedule so I quit my job and having been working part time. My insurance is through the ACA and I would not be covered otherwise. Due to medical reasons, my birth control is extremely expensive without insurance. The ACA had allowed me to follow my dreams while staying healthy and covered. If the ACA is repealed I will NOT have access to health care and I find that frightening.

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Tue Jun 20 2017

Michael in Missouri

I have pre-existing conditions: thryoid cancer, a lumbar back injury that caused major damage to the nerves in my feet (radiculopathy), diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, and double knee replacement. I would have a very hard time finding insurance without the Affordable Care Act.


Tue Jun 20 2017

Megan in Missouri

I had an emergency appendectomy last year. I received a call from the surgeon, telling me they found a cancerous tumor on my appendix, but thankfully was removed with the surgery. I have MRIs and lab work with my oncologist every 3-4 months to ensure that there isn't any progression. This year, I started having severe hip pain. After a referral to orthopaedics, physical therapy, and more tests – it's been discovered that I need surgery on my hip and have a growth on my hip that could be cancerous. I'm being referred to another physician next week. I tell my story not for sympathy. I'm one of the lucky ones. I'm 31, I am blessed with fantastic health insurance through my employer, but I haven't always been so lucky. We have to look out for our fellow Americans. Preexisting conditions can happen to anyone, anytime.


Tue Jun 20 2017

Erin in Missouri

I support ACA because it covers 100% of preventive services for infants and children. My daughter was born healthy, but she still needed 7 well-child check-ups during her 1st year of life. The ACA has helped keep her healthy.


Tue Jun 20 2017

Lisa in Missouri

I have been married for 28 years. We have 8 adopted children and 6 grandchildren. We are small business owners. Prior to the ACA we were unable to afford health care. When ACA became available we got insured. I was diagnosed with stage 4 rectal cancer in July 2014. Because of the ACA coverage I was able to receive life saving treatments, surgeries, hospital stays, and pharmaceuticals including the maintenance drug I continue to take 21 days a month. Without it I will die. Without the ACA I would have died then. Without the ACA, I will die now. My husband will be a widower at 50, my children, 3 still in school, left without a mother, my grandchildren without their Nana. We are more than a number.

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Tue Jun 20 2017

Kim in Missouri

At age 12, months after our mother passed away, my younger sister was diagnosed with adult hydrocephalus. She has had 3 shunts. Until the ACA, she had difficulty getting any insurance and it was always extremely expensive. When she married, she and her husband adopted a child from KC's DFS system. This child was diagnosed with multiple learning issues, speech & eye issues. She, too, now that she is 27, depends on the ACA. My other sister and myself both have pre-existing conditions. I was elated when the ACA passed so that we could not be denied for hydrocephalus and cancer. We are all now extremely worried about what TRUMPCARE/ NOCARE will do to us.
Tue Jun 20 2017

Chris in Missouri

In 2008 life was great – my wife Jen had just won the 3rd season of HGTV design star, we were headed for a new life in LA with her own TV show. We found we were pregnant, then we found something was wrong, then we found something was horribly wrong. My son, Winston, was born with a Lymphatic and Venous malformation, he had no airway or esophagus.

Winston could not be refused insurance for his 1st year, but he was dumped the second year and became uninsurable. In 7 years he has had 20 or so surgeries. He coded at 7 months – his tongue had filled with blood and it burst – he died for 3 minutes, but we got him back. After over 2 years being uninsured, the ACA came along – I remember talking to an agent at the exchange and told her all about Winston's pre existing conditions and she said we don't care your son is getting affordable insurance. On hearing her say that I cried for the 1st time in the whole ordeal – the relief that my son was going to be safe and get the help he constantly needs.

Winston will lose his life-saving, life-changing healthcare if the ACA is repealed. Five years ago Winston needed medication that cost $5000. We were so desperate and so broke – I remember taking my penny jar to an all night Walgreens to see if we could scrape together a payment for a few doses. It was probably the lowest moment of my life when I came home empty handed, and he ended up in Children's Mercy on the taxpayers' dime. We lost everything prior to Obamacare – the ACA allowed us to claw back into the middle class, to have self respect again and to know our son is getting the care he needs. I can't fight again. I am spent from the first round.

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Tue Jun 20 2017

Dennis in Missouri

I am now on Medicare, beginning the first of January, 2017. I will be receiving my first Social Security retirement benefits in a few weeks. The ACA is important to me for several reasons. First, as a Medicare recipient, it allows me to receive preventive medical services at little or no expense, as well as health screenings for several diseases. Second, it insures that I can get supplemental insurance coverage despite pre-existing conditions. Third, several of my younger friends are insured thanks to the provision to allow them to remain on their parents' plans to age 26. And finally, some twenty million of my fellow Americans now have health insurance because of the ACA. This is a case of spreading the risk, and reaping the benefits.

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Tue Jun 20 2017

Alison in Missouri

The ACA provided me with affordable insurance, including prescription coverage, when I left my full-time job in order to student teach. As a person who had had back surgery, pancreatitis and gall bladder removal less than a year before giving up my job/insurance, I was very grateful that my pre-existing conditions were not held against me and I could still purchase my prescriptions affordably. At this point in my life, I am still grateful for the rules included in the ACA that protect all insured people, even those who, like me, have employer-based insurance.

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Tue Jun 20 2017

Becky in Missouri

My daughter has type 1 diabetes. I am terrified at what repealing the ACA means for her. She will never be able to buy private insurance if the pre-existing clause is eliminated. Cash costs are in the tens of thousands per year. So if the lifetime cap is allowed again, she will run out of benefits at some point. We/she could easily go bankrupt and beyond just to be able to pay for her life-saving medication(insulin). Cash price for JUST her insulin is more than our house payment every month. That does not include test strips or any other diabetic supplies. 🙁 There would come a point where we/she would not be able to afford the medicine she needs to live. Repealing the ACA is an eventual death sentence for so many.

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Tue Jun 20 2017

Jennifer in Missouri

I am 27 years old. I just finished my first semester of law school. I am a fully independent student, no spouse to cover me. My parents haven't helped me pay my expenses since I moved out at 18 (meaning rent, food, gas; they did keep me on their health insurance until I finished college). I get extra loans from FAFSA to cover insurance expenses, but it isn't enough to pay for an individual plan. The only reason I can afford insurance is the tax credits.

I have an autoimmune disease that increases my risk of anxiety, heart disease, digestive disorders, and other autoimmunities. I also have asthma. Before the ACA, when insurers could deny coverage for preexisting conditions, some people with my disease died because they couldn't afford treatment. This is true of many treatable and manageable conditions, such as lupus. If an insurer does decide to cover people with those conditions, the premiums are high because we are deemed "risky." So, we still can't get coverage because we can't afford it.

I have a manageable condition that isn't even that expensive to manage. I usually just pay out of pocket for my care, and I spend maybe $800 a year. But I have to keep insurance in case something goes haywire, or I am in a car wreck, or my appendix decides to liberate itself from my abdomen. And that is what is being kept from me when insurers deny me coverage or charge me insane premiums.

I got good grades this semester. I worked hard and it paid off. But if the ACA is repealed and my coverage is taken away, there's a very real chance that I will have to drop out so I can look for a job with good coverage that won't price me out because of my condition. I don't believe I am entitled to a dream job, but I do think I will be a good lawyer, and it is sad that people with great potential are held back because of something like health.

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Tue Jun 20 2017

Carmen in Missouri

As a healthcare provider I have watched patients through the continuum of their medical care for many years. Before the ACA it seemed that hospitals did not care if patients had their follow up needs met or ability to obtain life-saving medications when they left the hospital. The attitude was one of "we've done everything we can here, now that's the patient's problem". With the implementation of the ACA. Hospitals now have a responsibility to ensure that patients have appropriate resources, appropriate instructions at discharge to ensure that they have the tools to continue to be healthy or to continue to obtain their life-saving medications. Before ACA the hospitals were reactionary. Now they have switched to a model of proactivity and patient education. This model is much better for patients.

carmen

carmen


Tue Jun 20 2017

Jennifer in Missouri

In May 2016, I went for my first ever routine mammogram. My insurance company covered it because it was a mandate in the Affordable Care Act. Within days I was shocked to discover that I was 1 of the 230,000 women in America who would be diagnosed with breast cancer in 2016. Only 7 weeks later I was undergoing a bilateral mastectomy to save my life. I am now one of the 127 million Americans with a pre-existing condition who stand to become uninsurable if the ACA is repealed. One-third of all cancer diagnosis in Missouri are breast cancers, a treatable disease if detected early. I'm including my story because I am thankful the Affordable Care Act mandates mammogram coverage and because it's important to speak up for the millions of women who don't yet know they have or will have breast cancer. Without question, repealing the ACA and it's preventative care and cancer screening protections will be a death sentence for many Missourians who don't even know it yet.

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Tue Jun 20 2017

Diana in Missouri

Obamacare changed my life. I was a teacher at a private school and my husband was an accountant at a small accounting firm. I knew I wanted to go back to school and get my masters degree but had to wait until my two children were out of preschool. The first year it was possible, I moved to a part time position at my school (becoming ineligible for health insurance) and began going to school full time. One month into my program, my husband lost his job at the accounting firm. This was a major crossroads for us. My husband had a dream of starting his own custom cabinet and furniture business, a skill he had developed while working in a cabinetry shop through accounting school. We decided that now was the time, and we immediately began to develop our small business. It has been over a year and our business has been a success! Owning our own business has been one of the greatest decisions of our lives! If Obamacare had not been available, the availability of insurance would have dictated our major life decisions. One of us would have had to give up our dreams/ life goals in order to cling to a job that offered insurance. Instead, I am on my way toward a master's degree, we own a successful small business, and the quality of our lives in terms of time with family, freedom of schedule, and general career fulfillment is better than ever before. We happily pay our $450/ month premium, because it is the same amount we would be paying with insurance under an employer. This is much more reasonable for our family of four than $1500/ month it would cost to buy our insurance privately, something our budding business cannot yet afford. We are not entitled. We are not lazy. We are working extremely hard and directly contributing to our local economy. Obamacare gave us the freedom to pursue the American Dream.

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Tue Jun 20 2017

Lori in Missouri

This is me and my nephew. I am pursuing a Master of Social Work at KU. To accommodate my class schedule and internships, I left my full-time job and have been working part-time for the last three years. Having insurance available through the marketplace allowed me to do this. However, even if I was working full-time, I would still need the marketplace because I am a behavioral interventionist for a very small company (Lifeworks Family Treatment Group) that does not provide health insurance to any of its employees.

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Tue Jun 20 2017

Hillary in Missouri

In 2008 I was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis. My symptoms have been well-managed with medication, but the medication is expensive, and I would not be able to afford it without insurance. The ACA's protections for preexisting conditions have taken a load off my mind the past eight years. It has meant that I haven't had to worry that a job loss would mean the loss of my healthcare.

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Tue Jun 20 2017

Anne in Missouri

What a great day when I learned these cuties could be on my health insurance until they were 26. Thanks, ACA!

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Tue Jun 20 2017

Ashley in Missouri

In 2006 I began my master's program. I had received a graduate assistantship position which had a small stipend, but no health insurance. Since we moved to a different state for my graduate program my husband had to find a new job. He was able to get a job at an engineering company as a temporary worker, which also meant no health insurance. In my 2nd semester of graduate school we found out I was pregnant. While it wasn't what we had planned were still excited. However, our excitement was tempered by the fact that we didn't have health insurance and we mainly were living off of what my husband was making. We applied for insurance knowing we would have to find a way to pay out of pocket for our premiums, but we wanted good medical care for our unborn child. We were turned down because my pregnancy was considered a pre-existing condition. We found that the state we lived in had an insurance program for pregnant women, which we applied for and received, but it only covered 2 doctors visits and something like 50% of the cost of the birth, even though we had to pay monthly over $100. While $100 may not seem like a lot to some people, it was a lot of money for us at that time in our life. The insurance would have been okay if I didn't have any complications. Well I did have complications, which required multiple doctor's visits and 2 ER visits. In the end I lost our baby in my 2nd trimester. We were heartbroken. I can't express how painful it is to lose a baby, unborn or not. Our grief was compounded by the huge medical bills we had to pay. It took 5 years, and some assistance from family, for us to fully pay it off. We were lucky that we were able to pay it off, and we struggled to make the payments. Many people can't afford to pay their medical bills in full if they don't have assistance. This is why we must keep pre-existing condition coverage! Women and men should not have to struggle to have access to quality medical care because they can't afford the care. We are now in a place in our careers that we are comfortable but I will never forget the struggle we had with medical coverage. We were both contributing, taxpaying, and productive members of America. Yet, we struggled in a private insurance world that excludes anyone that has what they deem a pre-existing condition. A pregnancy should never be a pre-existing condition! If our congress truly cares about Americans and promoting healthy families they must uphold coverage of pre-existing conditions and other benefits of the ACA.

Tue Jun 20 2017

Sally in Missouri

There was a mix up with the private insurance at my husband's job in 2014. He faxed our enrollment information but UHC claimed they never received it and were unwilling to budge, even though we had been on the plan for 6 years, they said my two young sons and I had to wait for enrollment the following year. This was going to leave us without insurance for 6 months. We were able to immediately apply and get insurance with Coventry via the ACA Marketplace. This kept us all insured, which is imperative to cover asthma, an anaphylactic nut allergy (epi pens needed), anxiety and chronic eczema between the three of us. We were covered immediately, able to see doctors and fill prescriptions, and then were able to leave the plan with ease when the new year started. The ACA gave us an option for affordable health care and peace of mind when private insurance failed us.


Tue Jun 20 2017

Jake in Missouri

I have Multiple Sclerosis & am lucky enough to have had employer based healthcare when I was diagnosed. That was pre-ACA. If my MS had been diagnosed when I wasn't on that insurance, nobody would have covered me. Or it would have been too expensive. The passage of the ACA meant I could stop worrying about a break in coverage that would keep me from getting new insurance because of my pre-existing condition. It meant that if I had a relapse the associated costs likely wouldn't bankrupt me. It meant not worrying about a plan that would impose a lifetime cap on my coverage, which with $200k/year in prescription costs alone wouldn't take long to reach.

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Tue Jun 20 2017

Amy in Missouri

My beautiful daughter Lainey has a genetic growth disorder called Turner Syndrome. Every night since she was 2, she gets a growth hormone shot. The ACA guaranteed she'd never be denied coverage for her pre-existing condition. Our insurance and prescription drug rates have remained steady under the ACA. She has the condition for life. What happens now?

Lainey

Lainey


Tue Jun 20 2017

Becky in Missouri

I was unable to get health care for ten years because of pre existing conditions. When I was able to finally get health care again I learned I was diabetic with other issues. Without ACA I could not afford insurance.

Tue Jun 20 2017

Rachelle in Missouri

I'm a small business owner, and the only reasons my family has had health insurance for the last 9 months are the ACA and the exchanges. Don't attack entrepreneurship!

rachelle

rachelle


Tue Jun 20 2017

Michelle in Missouri

My brother and I have pre-existing conditions due to our chronic illness. He will get kicked off my parents' insurance in October. Please don't repeal without a plan to replace and protect people like us who depend on healthcare to stay well.

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Tue Jun 20 2017

Deedra in Missouri

My daughter, Izzy, is 8 years old and has Cystic Fibrosis. She wasn't quite 2 years old when our private insurance covered through my husband's employer notified us that she had nearly reached her lifetime limit in February 2010. We were totally at a loss as to what to do as we couldn't move our toddler daughter to my insurance as Cystic Fibrosis was a pre-existing condition and we made too much to qualify for any state assisted program which already lacked several of the services we used with our private insurance. In the end, we would have likely had either lost our home or changed to lower paid careers to get government assistance. Luckily, we didn't have to worry for long. Within 2 weeks of receiving that letter, the ACA passed and our insurance preemptively removed lifetime limits. If these or pre-existing conditions are reinstated, we will seriously consider immigrating to Canada. I have already taken the step of finding a new employer just this month that will assist us with immigration if need be. I don't want to leave my friends, family, and country but I won't have many options if my daughter's healthcare and thereby her life become forfeit here as to protect the profit of the richest among us.

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Tue Jun 20 2017

Tanya in Missouri

We are the ACA. We utilize the marketplace. We make too much money for subsidies. We are the people who don't like everything about the ACA. We are the people that think it is insane that you would willingly take away insurance from millions of people who could not afford it otherwise. We are the people who are appalled that you don't have a plan to help the very people you are going to destroy. Fix it!!! Don't repeal it!!!! Govern responsibly for all people.

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Tue Jun 20 2017

Michelle in Missouri

For 6 years, I was denied insurance for pre-existing condition. I am a small business owner. For many years, I waited tables at night for the benefits, but they did away with them.

I had an emergency appendectomy and then a cancer scare which required biopsies every six months, which began my spiral into crippling debt. The ACA has allowed me to be the healthiest I have been in a decade. I finally paid off my medical debt and can work one job and expand my business. The ACA is everything to me and the thought of going back is devastating to me. Most entrepreneurs need the ACA to start new businesses. Revoking it also limits job growth. Thanks for listening!


Tue Jun 20 2017

Mikayla in Missouri

This is what a seizure looks like. Can you imagine watching your loved one go through this? Can you imagine the fear? Can you imagine having to pay $72,500+ for brain surgery to prevent these seizures that interfere with ability to work, drive, and live, because your insurance won't cover pre-existing conditions like left temporal lobe epilepsy.

I can-because this is the nightmare we are facing as we prepare for more video EEGs, transesophegial echocardiograms, and brain surgery in the next two years without the ACA.

Please, don't repeal without an affordable replacement already in place for families like mine.

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Tue Jun 20 2017

Rebecca in Missouri

My 14 year old daughter, Josephine, was diagnosed with a very rare neurological autoimmune disease that is caused by cancer when she was three years old. Her illness is currently in remission, but it took 10 years of treatment with monthly chemotherapy, infusions, and daily injections of a drug that costs $26,000 a month (Acthar Gel).

About 8 months after her diagnosis, I lost the job through which I had her privately insured. Because I was a single mother, living pretty close to the poverty line, she qualified for Medicaid. As the years went on, I met a wonderful man, but we could not marry because our combined incomes would have disqualified her for Medicaid. I also could not seek a better paying job because an increase in my income would have also disqualified her (or we would have to "spend down" (pay out of pocket) until at the poverty level before Medicaid would kick in and cover.)

After the ACA passed, my husband and I married (!), and I was able to take a well paying job. The ACA allowed my family a shot at the American Dream and the thought of having it all taken away is scary and infuriating.

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Tue Jun 20 2017

Robyn in Missouri

In 2013 after several years of marriage, my husband and I decided we were ready to have a child. We both had stable jobs, good income, and although my small firm didn't offer any insurance, he had wonderful benefits through his municipal job. When I was seven months pregnant with our daughter my husband came home on a beautiful Friday afternoon in early May of 2014 with the news that he had been laid off. We lost his income, our stability, and worst of all our health insurance. Other than the death of my mother seven years prior, it was the most devastating news of our lives.

We received in the mail the standard COBRA letter from his former employer, letting us know that continuing on with his health benefits would cost us $1,232.00 per month for the two of us. Half of my monthly take home income. At this point we were still waiting for his unemployment to be approved, and had no income from him we knew we could count on. I applied for Medicare for myself and the baby, mistakenly thinking that all pregnant women who did not have coverage through any employer would be covered while pregnant. This was not true and my salary, even with my husband not working and the baby counting as a household member, was too high to qualify. This is where the Affordable Care Act comes in. We were able to purchase a fully comprehensive plan including wonderful pre and post natal care for me for around $250.00 per month, and a plan for my husband as well should anything happen to him. Without the ACA, any private health insurance I would have been able to find would have excluded all care related to the pregnancy and delivery of our daughter, if I had even been able to find care in the first place. The ACA saved us from financial ruin, unnecessary stress and fear during the end of my pregnancy and the first month of our daughter's life while my husband found new employment. It allowed us to enjoy becoming first time parents without the fear of not being able to take care of child's medical needs or my own.

To say we will be forever grateful to President Obama for the ACA is an understatement. I cannot imagine what our lives would have been like for those months in the summer of 2014 without the medical coverage we were able to obtain.

Robyn

Robyn